Expanding your Personal Learning Network over social media

July, 2014 Interested in expanding your Personal Learning Network over social media? Here are some tools to make you a social media pro. HootSuite Read and schedule posts to Twitter,…

July, 2014 Interested in expanding your Personal Learning Network over social media? Here are some tools to make you a social media pro. HootSuite Read and schedule posts to Twitter,…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: Handy tools to grow you PLN

Unlocking the Potential of Technology – WEF Report

via New Vision for Education – Unlocking the Potential of Technology

To thrive in a rapidly evolving, technology-mediated world, students must not only possess strong skills in areas such as language arts, mathematics and science, but they must also be adept at skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving, persistence, collaboration and curiosity.

All too often, however, students in many countries are not attaining these skills. In this context, the World Economic Forum has taken on a multi-year initiative, New Vision for Education, to examine the pressing issue of skills gaps and explore ways to address these gaps through technology.

A powerful idea about ideas

Being a bit of a thicko when it comes to science, I’m not 100% sure of the one idea, but what got me was the teaching of a concept (such as acceleration) through action, rather than abstraction.

One of my colleagues was telling me yesterday of her teaching a Japanese language and culture course, by ‘sending’ her students on an ‘Amazing Race’ style journey, to different cities. The students would have to navigate their way ‘on’ a bullet train, and describe their experiences, in Japanese. The students loved it, and the approach of adaptive release, where one problem has to be solved before the next one is revealed meant the students were (in many cases) competing desperately to get the next challenge. This is presumably in contrast to learning the alphabet and building a vocabulary one syllable and one character at a time.

This might all seem a bit obvious, but I suspect it’s not as pervasive as it might be, in terms of teaching and learning practice.